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Drinks

How to create a cocktail in 4 easy steps

Making the perfect cocktail has never been easier … sure, it might take time to perfect the process but you never know what will happen on the way …

By: Tiff Christie|March 30,2019

Step 1.

Pick out a glass to put your cocktail in

Step 2.

Decide on the base spirit you want to use

Step 3

Get your heart broken

And we mean totally, irrevocably, gut-wrenchingly broken, by someone you thought loved you but obviously never really did.

On the way home from work you come across a bar and decide to drown your sorrows. You don’t know what to order, so you ask the bartender what he’d recommend. He makes you a New York Sour. You like it, but you don’t love it. The red wine float reminds you of just how much your heart is bleeding. You go home.

The next night, you go back to the bar again. You show the bartender a picture of your ex-partner. He commiserates. You ask him to make you something similar to the night before, but different (he knows what you mean…). He makes you a Whiskey Sour. That’s better, you think, but it still doesn’t quite hit the spot but you drink it none the less. You go home.

On the third night, the bartender is shaking up a drink before your ass has even hit the barstool. It’s a Gimlet. Sure it may look a little girly in that glass, but still, the sharpness of the Lime is hard to resist. You have another. Then another. You go home and drunk dial your ex-partner and sob for twenty minutes … and you think perhaps Gin should not be your liquor of choice …

You go to work, you go to the bar, you get served a new cocktail, you go home.

And you do it all again … and again … and again.

One day, instead of talking about your ex-partner, you ask the barman why he stirs some drinks instead of shaking them. He starts to explain to you about citrus and general bartending techniques. You find it interesting, and you start watching him more closely.

You go to work, you then go to the bar, you get served a new cocktail, you go home

And you do it all again … and again …

The bartender starts to put drinks in front of you and asks you if you can tell him what’s in them. It turns out to be a more interesting game than you thought. You learn about flavour, you learn about balance, and you learn about nuance.

You go to work, you then go to the bar, you get served a new cocktail, you go home.

One night, you realise that there’s someone else who comes to the bar regularly. They always sit two stools away from you, and they always end up getting the same drink as you have been served. You think it’s odd but hey …

You go to work, you go to the bar, you get served a new cocktail, you go home.

Soon that person starts talking to about the drink you both are drinking, and a discussion starts up about the distinction of different spirits. You start talking about how terroir adds to the flavour of certain Vodkas. Terroir in Vodka? What’s happening? You feel ashamed. You go home.

You go to work, you go to the bar, you drink a new cocktail, you discuss it with the person next to you, you go home.

You do it all again …

Soon you realise that it’s been eight months since you started going to the bar and by this time you’ve probably tried over 200 cocktails, half of those you’ve tried with that same person who sits near you. And you realise that perhaps its time you go out on your own.

So you ask that person to pick a drink they’ve really liked and you buy the ingredients together and suggest that they join you at your place so you can put into practice a little of what you’ve learned.

It’s only then that you realise that anything, whether it’s getting over heartbreak or learning to make some really good cocktails, just takes time.

Step 4

Choose a garnish

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How to create a cocktail in 4 easy steps

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